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Charting our path forward in Bali.

Honoring tradition. Creating a sustainable future together.


Embedded deeply in centuries of honored tradition, our partnership in Bali creates exquisite pieces of metalworking to be shared with you around the globe. 

Charting our path forward in Bali.

Honoring tradition. Creating a sustainable future together.

Embedded deeply in centuries of honored tradition, our partnership in Bali creates exquisite pieces of metalworking to be shared with you around the globe. 

The Meeting

Ignatius believed in the destiny of relationships. Now, so do we.

“Alright, one more,” Kallie told herself exasperated. It had been another hot day in Bali, a long day damp with humidity. She’d already been to a dozen other workshops: workshops that didn’t treat their workers well, workshops that couldn’t make the jewelry she wanted, workshops that were not right for the next chapter of 31 Bits. Weary and beleaguered, Kallie started to feel as though the efforts were hopeless, the dream of opening a new partnership in this beautiful country slipped further from her grasp until…she met Ignatius.

A smiling, bespeckled man, Ignatius ran a small cinder block workshop with one artisan. Yes, a single craftsman. His industry had been struggling, and Ignatius was fighting to maintain his business, provide for his family, and preserve a precious artform.

But despite the pressure, Ignatius was laid back and generous with both his time and his positivity. Kallie outlined the designs she was hoping to have made, and he stopped her.

“I believe in the destiny of relationships,” Ignatius declared. 

He went on to explain that when he was generous with his time, open to change and to new ventures, it would all find its way back to him and present him with opportunity—just like this one.

The next day, Kallie returned to examine the samples they’d designed together, and she was floored by the exquisite craftsmanship and fine attention-to-detail in each and every piece. More than anything though, his pride in the work was infectious.

Ignatius had found his opportunity, and so had 31 Bits.

The Meeting

Ignatius believed in the destiny of relationships. Now, so do we.

“Alright, one more,” Kallie told herself exasperated. It had been another hot day in Bali, a long day damp with humidity. She’d already been to a dozen other workshops: workshops that didn’t treat their workers well, workshops that couldn’t make the jewelry she wanted, workshops that were not right for the next chapter of 31 Bits. Weary and beleaguered, Kallie started to feel as though the efforts were hopeless, the dream of opening a new partnership in this beautiful country slipped further from her grasp until…she met Ignatius.

A smiling, bespeckled man, Ignatius ran a small cinder block workshop with one artisan. Yes, a single craftsman. His industry had been struggling, and Ignatius was fighting to maintain his business, provide for his family, and preserve a precious artform.

But despite the pressure, Ignatius was laid back and generous with both his time and his positivity. Kallie outlined the designs she was hoping to have made, and he stopped her.

“I believe in the destiny of relationships,” Ignatius declared. 

He went on to explain that when he was generous with his time, open to change and to new ventures, it would all find its way back to him and present him with opportunity—just like this one.

The next day, Kallie returned to examine the samples they’d designed together, and she was floored by the exquisite craftsmanship and fine attention-to-detail in each and every piece. More than anything though, his pride in the work was infectious.

Ignatius had found his opportunity, and so had 31 Bits.

Ignatius had found his opportunity, and so had 31 Bits.

celebrating lives changed.

The Workplace

A family-oriented culture for dignified work

Inside the Bali workshop, Ignatius’ young daughter runs around chatting with artisans on break. She spies Mafud, a long-time worker in the shop, and climbs onto his lap, giddy. He smiles and proceeds to show her what he’s working on today. 

They’re family, each and every one of the artisans. And it’s because of their families that they’re here developing their skills, growing their careers, working to support generations before them and ones ahead of them. 

And Ignatius treats them like family, paying every artisan double what other workshops in the area pay. He fosters a culture that encourages growth, development, and team learning, but most importantly, he makes sure they’re able to spend time with and invest in their own families.


Fair wages: 2x what they would receive elsewhere. Enough for some to put their kids through college—something only 11% of Indonesians have done.

Flexible schedules: In a commuting work culture that sometimes requires artisans to go months without seeing their families, artisans are able to take time when they need it. If they need to spend a week with their family, they just go. 

Family-oriented culture: Scheduling and unlimited vacation time to see their families when they need or want to. The supportive, invested, familial feeling within the workshop.

Passion for their craft: When the artisans are shown a new design, it’s a frenzy of enthusiasm. Thoughts of inspired excitement percolate and bubble over: “How can we add to it? What can I learn?” It’s infectious.

A supportive collective: Each of the artisans has their own unique specialty and point of view when creating. But they all want to learn, evolve, and better their crafts, so they share knowledge and train each other.

The Workplace

A family-oriented culture for dignified work

Inside the Bali workshop, Ignatius’ young daughter runs around chatting with artisans on break. She spies Mafud, a long-time worker in the shop, and climbs onto his lap, giddy. He smiles and proceeds to show her what he’s working on today. 

They’re family, each and every one of the artisans. And it’s because of their families that they’re here developing their skills, growing their careers, working to support generations before them and ones ahead of them. 

And Ignatius treats them like family, paying every artisan double what other workshops in the area pay. He fosters a culture that encourages growth, development, and team learning, but most importantly, he makes sure they’re able to spend time with and invest in their own families.


Fair wages: 2x what they would receive elsewhere. Enough for some to put their kids through college—something only 11% of Indonesians have done.

Flexible schedules: In a commuting work culture that sometimes requires artisans to go months without seeing their families, artisans are able to take time when they need it. If they need to spend a week with their family, they just go. 

Family-oriented culture: Scheduling and unlimited vacation time to see their families when they need or want to. The supportive, invested, familial feeling within the workshop.

Passion for their craft: When the artisans are shown a new design, it’s a frenzy of enthusiasm. Thoughts of inspired excitement percolate and bubble over: “How can we add to it? What can I learn?” It’s infectious.

A supportive collective: Each of the artisans has their own unique specialty and point of view when creating. But they all want to learn, evolve, and better their crafts, so they share knowledge and train each other.

They’re family, each and every one of the artisans.

The Craft

2500 years of metalworking tradition.

For thousands of years, metalworking has been embedded in the soul of Indonesia. Bronze drums made in Bali were found dating back to the fifth century BC, more than 25 centuries ago.

As the artform has evolved, regions have developed their own specialties like branches from a tree extending out to the tiny islands of Bali and Java. Both island cultures express their own unique expertises in their metalworking traditions. Our Javanese artisans focus on fine filigree, creating intricate pieces with exquisite detail.

The shared rooted heritage lends itself to a collaborative culture and a passion for design and learning. From the first cut of brass to the soldering and sanding to the final polish, the long and intricate process of creating a piece of jewelry is creative, expressive, and fulfilling. Artisans light up discussing new design elements and support each other by sharing techniques. The result? Each piece is forged with a rich dedication to tradition and innovative design.

The shared rooted heritage lends itself to a collaborative culture and a passion for design and learning. From the first cut of brass to the soldering and sanding to the final polish, the long and intricate process of creating a piece of jewelry is creative, expressive, and fulfilling. Artisans light up discussing new design elements and support each other by sharing techniques. The result? Each piece is forged with a rich dedication to tradition and innovative design.

The Craft

2500 years of metalworking tradition.

For thousands of years, metalworking has been embedded in the soul of Indonesia. Bronze drums made in Bali were found dating back to the fifth century BC, more than 25 centuries ago.

As the artform has evolved, regions have developed their own specialties like branches from a tree extending out to the tiny islands of Bali and Java. Both island cultures express their own unique expertises in their metalworking traditions. Our Javanese artisans focus on fine filigree, creating intricate pieces with exquisite detail.

The shared rooted heritage lends itself to a collaborative culture and a passion for design and learning. From the first cut of brass to the soldering and sanding to the final polish, the long and intricate process of creating a piece of jewelry is creative, expressive, and fulfilling. Artisans light up discussing new design elements and support each other by sharing techniques. The result? Each piece is forged with a rich dedication to tradition and innovative design.

The shared rooted heritage lends itself to a collaborative culture and a passion for design and learning. From the first cut of brass to the soldering and sanding to the final polish, the long and intricate process of creating a piece of jewelry is creative, expressive, and fulfilling. Artisans light up discussing new design elements and support each other by sharing techniques. The result? Each piece is forged with a rich dedication to tradition and innovative design.


2500 Years of Metalworking Tradition.

The Collection

Island beauty meets innovation.

Inspired by the rich artistic legacies of Bali and Java, our Bali Collection features intricate brass and silver detailing reminiscent of islands’ cultural and ceremonial pieces, translated into modern designs.

We celebrate these cultures and their rich artistic legacies of metalworking, and in doing so, celebrate the hands that created each item in the collection. 

Nano-coating techniques improve durability and ensure that you’ll love these pieces for years to come.

Shop The
Bali Collection

The Collection

Island beauty meets innovation.

Inspired by the rich artistic legacies of Bali and Java, our Bali Collection features intricate brass and silver detailing reminiscent of islands’ cultural and ceremonial pieces, translated into modern designs.

We celebrate these cultures and their rich artistic legacies of metalworking, and in doing so, celebrate the hands that created each item in the collection. 

Nano-coating techniques improve durability and ensure that you’ll love these pieces for years to come.

The Collection

Island beauty meets innovation.

Inspired by the rich artistic legacies of Bali and Java, our Bali Collection features intricate brass and silver detailing reminiscent of islands’ cultural and ceremonial pieces, translated into modern designs.

We celebrate these cultures and their rich artistic legacies of metalworking, and in doing so, celebrate the hands that created each item in the collection. 

Nano-coating techniques improve durability and ensure that you’ll love these pieces for years to come.


Shop The
Bali Collection